Banana Fairy’s Camera in Donkey Kong 64

Donkey Kong 64 (Rare, Ultimate Play the Game, 1999).

The Banana Fairy’s Camera is the magical camera that players receive from the Banana Fairy Princess in Donkey Kong 64. The purpose of the camera is to take pictures of the Banana Fairies. It is the only method to catch Banana Fairies, as it traps them inside special banana skin photographs. The camera is fueled by Banana Camera Film. The more pictures the players take of Banana Fairies, the more secrets and extras they unlock in the game. Any Kong can use the camera.

It is used by first holding Z Button, then pressing Camera down Button, and finally pressing B Button to snap a photo.

source: https://www.mariowiki.com/Banana_Fairy%27s_Camera

Advertisements

Magic Hour

Magic Hour (Wolf in Motion Ltd, 2016)

With Magic Hour, get started with VR photography! Take beautiful pictures by exploring an island lit in the perfect light and experiment with an accurate virtual SLR camera that incorporates all the physics of a real camera, in VR.

source: http://store.steampowered.com/app/571500/Magic_Hour/

Sonicomi

Super Sonico is a cheerful, hardworking college student and amateur musician who’s about to make her modeling debut. As her personal photographer, you will be responsible for Sonico’s image, balancing the needs of your clients with your own vision for Sonico’s future. Cute, sexy, weird — the costumes you choose will determine her path as a model. Will you cultivate mainstream appeal? Make Sonico a subculture icon? Or will she become something even you can’t imagine? It all depends on you!

Source: http://store.steampowered.com/app/444140/Sonicomi/

 

Super Mario Odyssey features photo-mode

The latest iteration of a video game icon, Super Mario Odyssey, is now equipped with a photo-mode, too.

Kotaku collected in-game photos taken by players of Super Mario Odyssey (attention: contains a few light spoilers):

https://kotaku.com/players-are-taking-amazing-super-mario-odyssey-photos-1820006202.

 

Gamespot produced some in-game photos of their own:

https://www.gamespot.com/gallery/super-mario-odysseys-photo-mode-is-crazy-fun/2900-1591/6/

 

The same goes for US Gamer:

http://www.usgamer.net/articles/super-mario-odyssey-fans-are-using-photo-mode-to-take-some-hilarious-pictures

Claire Hentschker – GTA Image Average Series

Claire Hentschker, “GTA Image Average Series”, 2017


Avatar above the Sea, © Claire Hentschker, 2017

Rückenfigur, literally “back-figure” in German, is a compositional device that was often used by Caspar David Friedrich. In Friedrich’s painting Wanderer in the Sea of Fog, the viewer is invited into the composition through a figure in the painting’s foreground that serves as surrogate for the scene. We see the back of the man’s black coat as he stands atop a rocky terrain before the grandness of the sea, horizon, and sky before him. The man gazes into sublime nature, and through him—this Rückenfigur—we, the viewers of the painting, become immersed in the setting and can witness his grand view of the landscape with our own eyes, as if through the back of his head. Grand Theft Auto V presents a similar opportunity for immersion into a landscape by way of an avatar with its back turned—a digital Rückenfigur of sorts.

Owning and playing Grand Theft Auto (GTA) is not the only way to experience the majesty of a digital world that has been created to encapsulate the narrative of the game. Many individuals participate in the YouTube economy of posting and watching videos of gameplay. Such documentation videos are frequently recorded in third-person mode, characterized by the back of an avatar at the center of the screen through which the player navigates the world. With this perspective, the landscape shifts while the avatar remains relatively fixed in the foreground of the scene. Unlike in Friedrich’s world, the Rückenfigur through which we experience the GTA landscape is not necessarily human. There are third-person videos to be found featuring any or all the following protagonists: bikes, cars, trucks, trains, motorcycles, blimps, helicopters, boats, and even all-powerful and immortal deer. (The latter the result of a fantastic artwork by Brent Watanabe.)

The desire to capture the sublime potential of nature through an idealized scene may have begun with Friedrich, but it transcends the ages, as evidenced in the names of uploaded gameplay videos. Excerpts entitled GTA 5 SunsetGTA V: Beautiful sunset flightGrand Theft Auto V—The Drive Through The SunsetGTA 5—Beat The Sunset: A Drifting Montage, only begin to scratch the surface of the vast amount of video recorded by one player’s avatar’s experience of the same algorithmic sunset. These videos consistently feature comments by viewers expressing their gratitude for the video and their shared appreciation of the beauty of the landscape. For example, viewer GTAgreat says, “Good job. Sunset is breathtaking :OOO.”

In this series of works, I want to investigate Grand Theft Auto as a subject of art that transposes Friedrich’s subjective Romanticism to the digital age. I am particularly interested in working with videos that other players have already deemed important enough to share. This collection provides a sampling of GTA’s digital world that incorporates both the gaze of an avatar and the eyes of a living viewer encoded into the experience of the scene. The view and the location presented around the avatar is a representation of what a single player decided to record and share.

To create the images in the series, I employed a technique called “image averaging,” notably used previously by artists such as Jim Campbell and Jason Salavon. The average of a series of digital images is calculated so that the more consistent characteristics shared by the images are rendered in greater detail. In this case, I was using video frames from YouTube videos of GTA gameplay. The game’s avatar, consistently encountering the world around it, remains a constant presence on the screen and is therefore rendered in more detail than the surrounding world. As the world passes by, the avatar remains virtually unchanged, and the contrast between the more realized avatar and the blur of the shifting landscape becomes evident in the resulting images. Each image is the sum of someone’s desire to share an imaginary world through a gameplay video. And, as Sammy R—in the comments section of one of these videos assures us—“This is Art.”

source: http://www.clairesophie.com/gta-image-average-series/

UFO: A Day In The Life

UFO: A Day In The Life (Love-de-Lic, 1999)

the player must use a device called “COSMIC,” a kind of camera, to reveal the creatures. Once a certain number of photographs have been taken, the player character returns to the ship to develop the pictures. This is done by giving the negatives to a giant floating head called “Mother.” As more aliens are rescued, more areas open up and different times of day are available for exploration.

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UFO:_A_Day_in_the_Life