Rob Wetzer – Lost Worlds (2013 – ongoing)

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Installation shots of Lost Worlds at Photo Festival Schiedam 2017, http://www.fotofestivalschiedam.nl/exhibition/lost-worlds/
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Lost Worlds in Raw View #8, http://www.rawview.org/product/raw-view-8/

Lost Worlds is a visual exploration for what we perceive as nature, or natural.

The environments in which I make these images are the virtual landscapes of videogames. Where these landscapes used to be cardboard backdrops, they have become seemingly unlimited worlds. Designed to seduce the player to go explore pristine landscapes, they contain lush rainforests, icy mountain ranges, rushing waterfalls and barren deserts. Well-programmed weather systems provide rain, sunshine or snow and day and night cycles add to the ‘realness’ of the experience. To achieve a sublime-as-possible experience, the designs of these landscapes borrow heavily from Romantic interpretations of nature by painters as Caspar David Friedrich and Albert Bierstadt.

source: https://www.robwetzer.nl/lost-worlds/

more info: http://www.gamescenes.org/2017/02/game-art-robert-wetzers-lost-worlds-2013-ongoing.html

Eva and Franco Mattes – Reenactments

Artists Eva and Franco Mattes have reenactedhistorical performances inside videogames, in their work titled Reenactments (2007-10).

Performances reenacted include works by Gilbert&George, Marina Abramovic, Vito Acconci, Chris Burden and Valie Export. Anyone could participate connecting from all over the world.

Eva + Franco Mattes

Eva + Franco Mattes The Pigs of Todat are the Hams of Tomorrow Plymouth, January 2010

Reenactment of Marina Abramovic and Ulay’s Imponderabilia (2007-10)

more on the artists page: http://0100101110101101.org/reenactments/

James Bridle – Picture Piece: Video Game Photography

On Frieze Magazine, James Bridle shows Justin Berry’s Stone Shields (2012) – an image taken from the game Medal of Honor – and compares it with Anselm Adams’ 1968 photograph El Capitan, Winter, Sunrise, Yosemite National Park, California.

It doesn’t carry any obvious signs of digital manipulation, but it bears out Adams’s famous remark: ‘You don’t take a photograph, you make it.’ Stone Shields is a composite of screenshots, created within the virtual world of the first-person-shooter video game Medal of Honor: its landscape is entirely digital. It is a composite of composites, as every pixel has been rendered from millions of lines of code and pre-existing textures created by the game’s designers, captured within the experience of the game itself (one notorious for its violence and militarism), and ultimately manipulated by Berry. In its artifice, it reveals all the artifice of image-making itself.

in his ending remark Bridle aligns the construction of the image through the camera medium and the textured digital image making process:

photography itself is a construct, and all images contain the mechanics of their own making.

full article: http://www.frieze.com/issue/article/picture-piece-video-game-photography/

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“Virtual Light: Exploring In-Game Photography And Photo History”

Eron Rauch, “A Land to Die In (Every Player Corpse from 1-70)” from A Land to Die In (Detail)

Eron Rauch attempts to categorise the different kinds of in-game photographs in four categories, drawing a parallel with the history of photography and its development.

So what were people doing with photography for that whole previous century if they weren’t sure if it was art? I know I’m being facetious, but the question begs a number of interesting followup-questions which directly inform what is happening now with IGP and virtual photography: Why do people make photographs? Who makes photographs? What kinds of photographs get made? What does photography mean in the internet age?

Well, let’s run through a few of the major historical veins of photography to see what they might teach us about talking about a broadened pallet of types of IGP. These aren’t absolute categories, in fact many photographs can be part of more than one category or even change categories as they age (such as the military survey photos of the uncolonized American West now being shown as art in the Getty).

Let’s talk about four categories. We’ll call these photography divisions “Art”, “Amateur,” “Artisan,” and “Vernacular.”

Full article: http://videogametourism.at/content/virtual-light-exploring-game-photography-and-photo-history

Eron Rauch website: http://www.eronrauch.com/

A Land To Die In project page: http://www.eronrauch.com/#/a-land-to-die-in/

“Gamescenes” by Matteo Bittanti

Matteo Bittanti is an artist and writer who works with and write about games and art. His blog gamescenes.org is a great resource for the wider explorations of the gameart world.

Many in-game photography projects can be found under this category search: http://www.gamescenes.org/photography/

Selected projects found via gamescenes:

Coll.Eo, “FOLLOWING BIT” (2013)

Lim Laughton,“Los_santos.Obj” (2014)

Damien Hypolite, “Then And Now” (2014)

Casey Brooks, “You Only Live Forever” (2014)