What Remains of Edith Finch

What Remains of Edith Finch (Giant Sparrow, 2017) has a part of the games that uses photography mechanics as part of the gameplay. Focusing and taking a picture at the correct subject triggers the story to move forward.

Note: video below is a walkthrough and contains spoilers of the game.

 

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Lost: Via Domus

Lost: Via Domus (Ubisoft, 2008) is a game spin off of the Lost TV series, where you play a photo journalist named Elliott Maslow who loses his memory in a plane crash.

The game employs the use of flashbacks as a storytelling device, much like the television show, and gamifies the act of photographic capture as a way to retrieve memories. Framing, focusing and zooming are realistically simulated in-game, while the function of the photographic act is given the supernatural power to “cure” the protagonist’s amnesia.

1979 Revolution

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They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but what about a videogame? The first episode of 1979 Revolution, a game that places you in the middle of the Iranian hostage crisis, speaks to just how important visibility can be when corruption and misinformation run rampant. You play as Reza, a photographer tasked with capturing the chaos of the regime change and subsequent protests. In this context, a picture becomes as dangerous as a stray bullet, rendering you a big target. A well-researched passion project from creator Navid Khonsari, 1979 takes you back to this important moment in history with a Telltale-style branching narrative. The consequences of your actions are palpable, your choices affecting the families and the splintered factions forming around you. Pushing both the medium and player to new heights, 1979‘s first episode can not only educate an unaware American audience, but also help us see our own role in the turmoil (source: Killscreen)

 

see also: https://killscreen.com/articles/1979-revolutions-to-explore-the-black-friday-massacre-this-april/

find the game here: http://inkstories.com/1979RevolutionGame/

Paparazzi

Paparazzi for Playstation 2 (HuneX, 2005, original title: The Camera Kozou) is a photography simulation game where the player has to take pictures of models, with the possibility to request the model to look at the camera, to “adopt a charming pose”, “adopt a sexy pose” and “get a kiss on the fly”. The player/photographer can also dance, jump and wave hands to build empathy with the subject and it’s possible to move around the photo shoot location to take the best shots of the model’s performance.

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While the content of the game is questionable, with much of the game’s 3D physics simulation spent on rendering the bouncing of the models’ oversized breast, the camera simulation in manual mode contains many parameters rendered directly from analogue cameras (namely flash, zoom, focus, aperture and shutter speed).

In-game photo mode in Euro Truck Simulator 2

The truck simulation game Euro Truck Simulator 2 (ETS2, SCS Software 2012) is interesting with regard to in-game photography because it does not force the user to push the screenshot button on the keyboard in order to take a picture instead it features an in-game photo mode. This feature was introduced in update 1.12 and works like a photo studio to go so that users can take crisp snapshots of their trucks wherever they are in the game world. In the best tradition of car photography they take location, lighting, setting, interior or exterior details, etc. into account for the right composition. Users can upload and share their photos on the game’s World of Trucks which partly functions like a flickr for ETS2 players.

The photo mode interface in ETS2.

The in-game photo mode interface in ETS2.

To get the right look the interface of the in-game photo mode allows to tilt, pan, and roll the camera. The player can move the point of view to get the right composition. Particularly interesting is that one can change the field of view (FOV), the depth of field (DOP), as well as the focus which adds essential photographic features to the screenshot.

Changing the FOV corresponds to changing the focal length with a zoom lens or to changing prime lenses of different focal lengths. Changing the DOP corresponds to changing the aperture of a camera which allows for a blurry background effect in case the the DOP is chosen to be rather narrow around the focus area. Eventually, users can use where to place their focus.

Apart from this the mode also allows for some configurations which are normally part of the photographic post-processing. As such the user can choose to change the color balance of their image as well as the saturation.

And, yes, that’s my truck in the second photo!