Raphael Brunk

“A conversation with artist Raphael Brunk” By Ruth Polleit Riechert

Did you reprogram the computer games for that purpose?

Three years ago, there was no software that could be used in computer games to generate images with a native resolution in the three-digit megapixel range, to go beyond a typical screenshot. My idea was: I want to take photos in computer games, but the work must have a certain quality in terms of sharpness and resolution, and it must be printable as very large formats without compromising the quality. Two of my friends who happen to be software developers “wrote” a camera we developed together: it’s a camera simulation. It works like a digital camera, and I can use it to shoot “ingame”.

And later you even reprogrammed computer games, so that the camera could take photos of things, that you usually don’t see in the game.

Exactly. We found a way to get into some kind of meta-level within the game, in which certain elements of the game structure are invisible. Therefore, the images look like architectural models or collages. For example, there is a lantern hovering somewhere, but it has no foundation. This is how the pictures in the “Captures” series were created. During the editing process, each image is rasterised into at least 400 individual image sections, which, based on a particular algorithm, are subsequently reassembled to become one picture.

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source: https://magazine.artland.com/raphael-brunk/

Alan Butler, Sturtevant/a_m_f_skidrow_01 Finite Infinite, 2018

SITUATION #129: Alan Butler, Sturtevant/a_m_f_skidrow_01 Finite Infinite, 2018

part of Fotomuseum Winterthur SITUATIONS programme.

In Sturtevant/a_m_f_skidrow_01 Finite Infinite, a short video loop portraying a non-player character (NPC) from a computer game is projected on a rotating beamer in the installation space. The installation builds on Butler’s previous work, Down and Out in Los Santos. There, the artist embarked on a journey through the social landscape of the video game Grand Theft Auto V to document the lives of homeless NPCs in the virtual city of Los Santos. One of the characters he encountered is at the centrepiece of his new work: a homeless NPC that bears a striking resemblance to conceptual artist Sturtevant. The character is transformed into a hybrid, computational entity, half human-looking, yet resembling a dog running endlessly in circles. By directing our gaze to the characters that inhabit the uncanny borders of non/human, the artist challenges the viewer to rethink anthropomorphic representation and consider these digital entities and bots as autonomous creatures that do not subjugate to a human hierarchy.

Sturtevant/a_m_f_skidrow_01 Finite Infinite is accompanied by the online video essay Mondo Cane.

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source: https://www.fotomuseum.ch/en/explore/situations/154957

GTA IV selfie mod

JulioNIB created a mod for Grand Theft Auto IV, to allow a in-game “selfie mode”. The script and isntructions are available on his site: http://gtaxscripting.blogspot.it/2014/08/gta-iv-selfie-mod.html

 

This mod makes possible take some “selfies” in GTA IV, something similar to what we have in V, but here the photos are not related to the mobile phone, all script action. The photos are saved in the game Scripts folder (sElfie files folder). This mod was started some time ago by Josemar Santos.


 

Ip Yuk-Yiu

Ip Yuk-Yiu is a filmmaker, media artist, art educator and independent curator. His works, ranging from experimental films to live video performances and media installations, have been showcased extensively at international festivals including European Media Art Festival (Germany), New York Film Festival (USA), the Image Festival (Canada), VideoBrasil (Brazil), Transmediale (Germany), Hong Kong International Film Festival (Hong Kong) and Yamagato International Documentary Film Festival (Japan). His most recent solo program was featured at Experimental Film & Video Festival in Seoul (EXIS) in 2012. He has lectured extensively on film, video and media art. Currently he is Associate Professor and the Master of Fine Arts Program Leader at the School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong. His recent works explore performance-based and computational forms of cinema.

HD / color / stereo / 15 min. 30 sec or loop / 16:9 / 2012

ANOTHER DAY OF DEPRESSION IN KOWLOON (九龍百哀圖) is a virtual study and a digital portrait of Hong Kong as seen through the lens of contemporary popular culture incarnated in the forms of video game and screen media.

Using the map “KOWLOON” from the popular video game CALL OF DUTY: BLACK OPS (2010) as a field of study, the filmmaker conducted a yearlong virtual fieldwork: playing, observing and documenting “Hong Kong” as simulated in the video game world.

ANOTHER turns the violent first-person shooter into a series of vacant, uncanny and yet meditative tableaux, unearthing a formal poetry that is often overlooked during the original gameplay. It combines methodologies from both the observational and assemblage film traditions in raising questions about cultural representations in contemporary popular media, while at the same time creating evocative metaphors for a post-colonial Hong Kong through the reworking of media materials.

ANOTHER is a “found” landscape film, a ballad for a post-colonial Hong Kong seemingly trapped in endless downpours of murky political dismal.

HD / color / stereo / 11 min. / 16:9 / 2013

Evoking imagery and memories of the atomic age, THE PLASTIC GARDEN summons the ghost of a forgotten future, the grim fatality of a total nuclear war that held the world hostage half a century ago.

Hacking and appropriating the popular video game CALL OF DUTY: BLACK OPS (2010), THE PLASTIC GARDEN revisited the dark vision and symbolism of the nuclear drama that seems on the one hand remotely archaic, but hauntingly close and familiar on the other. The restaged scenes, devoid of bloody shootouts, are equally if not more lethal and violent than in the original game. THE PLASTIC GARDEN unravels a forgotten future that felt like an endless nightmare spinning loose, or else a collective death wish that comes to define the tragic essence of modern socio-political reality.

Kent Sheely

Kent Sheely is an artist who works extensively with videogame aesthetics and mechanics. He has been involved with in-game photography on several projects, many of which deal with interesting experiments on concepts of war, images, and games.

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Selected projects:

Youtube Shooter

An overlay for YouTube that mimics the view associated with First Person Shooter games, turning otherwise pedestrian and innocent scenes into dangerous situations. Viewers are given the ability to pick from a series of “levels.”

http://kentsheely.com/hud/

Aspect

A meditation on videogames, dreams, and walking with our shadows.
Vocal track excerpted from “Man & His Symbols” (Audiobook) by Carl G. Jung.

http://www.kentsheely.com/aspect

World War II redux

Famous photos from World War II, their details recreated as faithfully as possible using a video game engine.

http://www.kentsheely.com/world-war-ii-redux

Link to artist website: http://kentsheely.com/