Photo-copy by Cliffordius

Photo-copy (Cliffordius, 2018).

itch.io link: https://cliffordius.itch.io/photo-copy

You’ll walk about Black Rock City,  site of the Burning Man festival, and try your best to re-create  some photos.  Identify the landmarks in the photos, find the right place to stand, and choose just the right angle.

The city layout, camps, and landmarks are all procedurally generated.

It’s a first-person shooter in which you shoot photos.

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The Art of In-Game Photography talk + Shooting Virtual Cities: In-Game Photography Workshop

The Art of In-Game Photography, talk with Gareth Damian Martin and Rachel Falconer.

date: 7 July 2018, 12:00,
location: The Photographers’ Gallery, London

Video games present a new territory for photographers, one where the real and the virtual are in constant flux. The spaces created within them are as much places to be explored and experienced as they are entertainment and have given rise to the art form of ‘in-game photography’.

This talk introduces some of the photographic techniques applied by artists to the virtual environment and architecture within games and how their practice fits within a tradition of conceptual photographic work, with reference to photographers such as Thomas Demand and Hiroshi Sugimoto.

Artist and writer Gareth Damian Martin presents his work and is joined by digital art curator Rachel Falconer in a discussion of these innovative approaches.

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source: https://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/whats-on/talks-and-events/art-game-photography

 

Shooting Virtual Cities: In-Game Photography Workshop, by Gareth Damien Martin

date: 7 July 2018, 14:30-17:30
location: The Photographers’ Gallery, London

Working under the guidance of game photographer Gareth Damian Martin, this workshop gives participants the opportunity to create images that respond to and build upon game environments.

Documenting the city of Los Santos from the game Grand Theft Auto V, participants will work in small groups to produce a portfolio of work that responds to a specific area of the city, and in doing so learn about both game photography as well as ways of seeing, manipulating and documenting game worlds.

This workshop is aimed at both photographers interested in exploring photographic practice in games, those curious about game worlds and in-game photography, as well as those interested in exploring new approaches to street and urban photography.

Participants should bring their own devices to take photographs. No prior experience is necessary.

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source: https://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/whats-on/workshop/shooting-virtual-cities-game-photography-workshop

Camera Ludica, a video game walkthrough

Marco De Mutiis, Camera Ludica, a Video Game Photography Walkthrough, 2018, for The Photographers’ Gallery Media Wall.

Camera Ludica is a video essay exploring the recent phenomenon of what is often called in-game photography. This term comprises a range of practices – from taking screen shots to playing the character of a photographer, from game modifications created by players to photo modes developed by game studios.

The work is divided into three sections through which de Mutiis reveals the significant lineage of photography in games dating back to 1989. Together they offer a new understanding of photography’s relationship with computers.

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source: https://thephotographersgallery.org.uk/whats-on/exhibition/camera-ludica

Photos in Final Fantasy XV and Prompto’s in-game photography

In Final Fantasy XV (Square Enix, 2016) one of the character, Prompto Argentum, has photography skills and will take pictures of the gameplay, which are shown to the player when the characters are resting.

Prompto could be seen as an alternative Photo Mode “outsourced” to an NPC.

 

source: https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/boards/719092-final-fantasy-xv/74657693

Prompto’s photography skill is a passive ability that is used throughout your time playing Final Fantasy 15, requiring no input to progress. It generally progresses naturally as Prompto takes photographs of various things as you explore the game world.

At the end of each day Prompto will show you a list of photographs he has taken that day. You do have the option of saving the pictures into a gallery or even sharing them with your friends on social media, although this has no impact on leveling the skill itself.

Typically Prompto will take shots of exciting events throughout the day. Boss encounters, group exploration and meeting new figures within the story are all popular points for Prompto to take a quick snapshot.

At some points during the game you can influence Prompto’s photograph choices. When driving Prompto will ask Noctis what he wants to see in his photographs, you can reply with any of the main characters as a response – prompting Prompto (see what I did there?) to take more photographs featuring that specific character.

source: http://www.gamersheroes.com/game-guides/final-fantasy-xv-promptos-photography-skills-guide/

Interestingly, the photo feature was explicitly built to encourage circulation of images online and “impact social media”:

The photos feature was born out of the idea that more people are using smartphones and thus being connected to social media, and the developers wanted Final Fantasy XV to have an impact in that sphere.

If people are playing on their smartphones, then a lot of them are also using social media, right? So one of my goals in creating 15 was to craft a game that could have a big impact on social media. That’s what you’ve seen with the photographs and all the videos the players are sharing, and that’s a way of sort of reaching this audience. I think we did a pretty good job of it.

—Hajime Tabata, director of Final Fantasy XV
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However, some players have complained about the Prompto’s photographic skills:

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The game also contains photography as game mechanics, and photo shoot “missions”.

 

A Photo Mode that can be operated by the player is also available:

 

more info on Prompto’s photography AI: http://gdcvault.com/play/1024023/Prompto-s-Facebook-How-a

Ueli Alder, “out there…”, 2017

Ueli Alder’s “out there…” (2017) is a series that mixes photography from Swiss forests and landscapes from in theHunter: Call of the Wild (Expansive Worlds, 2017). Using infrared film and in-game photography, he plays with the boundaries of perception and challenges notions of realism in the photographic process at large.

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source: https://www.alderego.ch/out-there

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source: https://www.tagblatt.ch/kultur/fotografie-ich-bin-ein-extremist-ld.917059

No Photos, Please

No Photos, Please by dreasgrech.

In No Photos, Please!, the player takes control of either a Photographer or a Security Guard in a two player match. It is the Photographer’s object to snap a photo of all the exhibits in the museum while the Security Guard has the objective to identify and apprehend the Photographer before the timer runs out.

source: http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=210490900

note: the game has been Greenlit on Steam in 2014 but it has not been published yet.

James Bridle – Picture Piece: Video Game Photography

On Frieze Magazine, James Bridle shows Justin Berry’s Stone Shields (2012) – an image taken from the game Medal of Honor – and compares it with Anselm Adams’ 1968 photograph El Capitan, Winter, Sunrise, Yosemite National Park, California.

It doesn’t carry any obvious signs of digital manipulation, but it bears out Adams’s famous remark: ‘You don’t take a photograph, you make it.’ Stone Shields is a composite of screenshots, created within the virtual world of the first-person-shooter video game Medal of Honor: its landscape is entirely digital. It is a composite of composites, as every pixel has been rendered from millions of lines of code and pre-existing textures created by the game’s designers, captured within the experience of the game itself (one notorious for its violence and militarism), and ultimately manipulated by Berry. In its artifice, it reveals all the artifice of image-making itself.

in his ending remark Bridle aligns the construction of the image through the camera medium and the textured digital image making process:

photography itself is a construct, and all images contain the mechanics of their own making.

full article: http://www.frieze.com/issue/article/picture-piece-video-game-photography/

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Thibault Brunet

Thibault Brunet is a French photographer who works with images from game environments. His series Vice City (2008) is entirely shot within Grand Theft Auto Vice City and lets us “explore the spaces that are usually forgotten by players. The pictures show side spaces, barren and industrialized areas. The aesthetics reminds us contemporary photo shooting, Japanese engraving and painting. Confusion is over the nature and the origins of these floating pictures”.

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A pertinent way of questioning an unusual path, as yet little explored in contemporary creation: the aesthetic elements of video games, diverted and transformed into a work of art.

Amélie Adamo «Wandering in a Virtual World» ETC Magazine

Project page: http://thibaultbrunet.fr/#vice-city-4

 

In his series First Person Shooter, Brunet isolates landscapes from video games, that look like an uncertain Middle East location, and portraits of soldiers-characters.

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Brunet is successfully commenting on the surreality of virtual entertainment worlds created via avatars and algorithms that are in turn based on real-life, drawing us back in to consider the inherent surreality of war itself.

Amanda Lang, Aperture Foundation

Project page: http://thibaultbrunet.fr/#first-person-shooter-3