Suzanne Treister, Fictional Videogame Stills

Suzanne Treister, Fictional Videogame Stills (1991-1992)

In the late 1980s I was making paintings about computer games. In January 1991 I bought an Amiga computer and made a series of fictional videogame stills using Deluxe Paint II. I photographed them straight from the screen as there was no other way to output them that I knew of apart from through a very primitive daisy wheel printer where they appeared as washed out dots.

The effect of the photographs perfectly reproduced the highly pixellated, raised needlepoint effect of the Amiga screen image. Conceptually this means of presentation was also appropriate in that it made it seem like I had gone into a videogame arcade and photographed the games there, lending authenticity to the fiction.

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source: https://www.suzannetreister.net/Ampages/Amenu.html

Suzanne Treister, From Fictional Videogame Stills to Time Travelling with Rosalind Brodsky, 1991 – 2005, from ‘Videogames and Art’, Ed. Andy Clarke, Grethe Mitchell, Publ. Intellect Books, UK 2007: https://www.suzannetreister.net/Ampages/Treister_Essay.pdf

 

Raphael Brunk

“A conversation with artist Raphael Brunk” By Ruth Polleit Riechert

Did you reprogram the computer games for that purpose?

Three years ago, there was no software that could be used in computer games to generate images with a native resolution in the three-digit megapixel range, to go beyond a typical screenshot. My idea was: I want to take photos in computer games, but the work must have a certain quality in terms of sharpness and resolution, and it must be printable as very large formats without compromising the quality. Two of my friends who happen to be software developers “wrote” a camera we developed together: it’s a camera simulation. It works like a digital camera, and I can use it to shoot “ingame”.

And later you even reprogrammed computer games, so that the camera could take photos of things, that you usually don’t see in the game.

Exactly. We found a way to get into some kind of meta-level within the game, in which certain elements of the game structure are invisible. Therefore, the images look like architectural models or collages. For example, there is a lantern hovering somewhere, but it has no foundation. This is how the pictures in the “Captures” series were created. During the editing process, each image is rasterised into at least 400 individual image sections, which, based on a particular algorithm, are subsequently reassembled to become one picture.

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source: https://magazine.artland.com/raphael-brunk/

PHOTOGRAPHS by EightyEight Games

PHOTOGRAPHS (EightyEight Games, 2019)

Set off in the distance, you’re given a camera, looking to take photos of their lives: whether it be a grand-father and grand-daughter playing their favorite game, a diver perfecting her craft, or strangers working together to survive. Each photo is set with a small puzzle, each style different for each arc, that progresses the time line before taking the next photo. Each photo taken dives deeper into the lives of these five individuals, all the way to the climax of each arc, showing what went wrong, and our character’s wishes.

comment by thatdiesel

[…] As a photographer all the little details were a nice touch- seeing the camera settings change with the scene and even with cursor movement put a smile on my face.

The photographs are just a framing device for the story as it moves along. The experience is all about the stories.

comment by whythecynic

source: https://store.steampowered.com/app/1008920/Photographs/

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source: https://lucaredwood.itch.io/photographs

Slaparazzi (Super Mario Party 2018 mini game)

Super Mario Party (NDcube, 2018) contains a mini game titled Slaparazzi, where you compete against other characters to be in the center of the frame when the photograph is taken.

It’s an interesting twist compared to the usual paparazzi photography games, where the subject of the photo is the one with agency and attempting to get in the picture, rather than the photographer trying to get a picture of a (often unaware or non consensual) subject.

Photography missions in Jurassic World Evolution (2018)

Photography missions in Jurassic World Evolution (Frontier Developments plc, 2018). Similar to Afrika or beyond Good and Bad, the game uses photographic activities in game in a simulation of safari/animal species inventory mechanic.

Below are a few basic tips for taking the best photographs and them some dinosaur specific activities that net you extra cash for bonuses.

Jurassic World Evolution Photograph Guide – Photography Basics

  • You get bonus cash for each individual dinosaur in the shot
  • If a dinosaur is participating in an activity (eating, socializing, hunting etc) you get further bonuses
  • Your composition bonus increases based on your zoom level and central content. Make the best attraction middle and make sure the entire dino fits in the frame
  • Avoid taking pictures of the same species more than once or twice in a row.

Jurassic World Evolution Photograph Guide – Dinosaur Activities

  • Drinking
  • Eating Live Food (Live Bait)
  • Socializing (Usually herbivores that move in herds)
  • Hunting (When a carnivore is hunting another dinosaur
  • Running
  • Eating A Carcass (When a carnivore is eating the body of another dinosaur
  • Dinosaurs Fighting, Attacking

source: http://www.gamersheroes.com/game-guides/jurassic-world-evolution-photograph-guide/

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source: https://steamcommunity.com/app/648350/discussions/1/3559414588256806823/

 

Dreeps plays itself but wants you to take pictures…

Dreeps (Hisanori Hiraoka, 2015) is a game that “plays itself”, allowing the player to enjoy looking at the unfolding of the game. On the other hand, Dreeps provides a minimal button on its lower left encouraging players to take screenshots to be shared on social networking sites. Gameplay is outsourced to the software, while the photographic activity is handed back to the player-photographer, tightly connected to the distribution of images on sharing platforms.

For those who don’t have the time to play RPGs anymore,

this is a new type of game—an Alarm Playing Game!

To play dreeps, just set the alarm. That’s all. Easy, right?

When you head to bed, the robot boy will sleep just like you, regaining HP and recharging for his next day of adventure!

When the alarm rings in the morning, both of you will wake up and start your day. When you go to work or school, the robot boy will head out on an adventure through fields, valleys, and peninsulas where monsters roam. Or, he might discover dungeons where strange bosses lurk…

Either way, every day is a new day for you and the robot boy!

But how does adventuring work? That’s real easy!

After the alarm sounds, the robot boy’s adventure will automatically continue as long as he has enough HP, even while the app is closed. You might miss some events, but don’t worry about it.
 There’s almost no text in this game.

So whenever you feel like it, load dreeps up and check on the robot boy’s adventure. Or, leave it running on your desk while you work, study, or snack. Play however you want, and take it at your own pace.

Visuals and sound can give you hints to what sort of story is unfolding in this little world. But use your imagination! Take those hints and try to guess just what’s happening. Oh! And don’t forget that you can share screenshots of and thoughts about the game by pressing the “Share” button.

dreeps was created to give the player the ability to enjoy a story little by little, day by day. With beautifully crafted art and animations, this is a new kind of game that’s easy to pick up and simple for anyone to learn.

source: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/dreeps-alarm-playing-game/id953366068?mt=8

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